Jargon buster

The IT, technology and infrastructure love to create new words and acronyms.

So to make things simple and easy to understand about all the work we do here’s a list of terms you may find across the website or when working with GTS Comms.

  • 3 Compartment Trunking – this is just like normal trunking; however this has 3 compartments which are used to segregate different types of cable, this is needed because power will often interfere with data or audio cables.
  • AP – An access point (AP) is a device that creates a wireless local area network (WLAN) in an office or building. It is a commercial version of a wireless router in a home.
  • AUX – An auxiliary port (AUX) is a type of port found in electrical equipment such as TVs and phones and allows you to carry audio signals such as MP3.
  • Bandwidth – is the amount of data that can be carried from one point to another
  • Cable Management – Cable management is the organising of your cables in a professional and high-quality manner so that they are accessible, easy to identify and are presentable within a building.
  • CAT5 & CAT6 – Cat5,6, 6e are different types of data cables we use on our projects.
  • CHAS – The Contractors Health and Safety Assessment Scheme (CHAS) allows contractors like GTS Comms to establish to clients they meet health and safety standards.
  • Comms Cabinet – A comms cabinet a central unit where your data cabling and devices are housed.
  • Conduit – A conduit is a tube used to protect and route data cabling across a building.
  • Crosstalk – Crosstalk is where data is fed from one channel to another and this causes interference.
  • DB – A Decibel (dB) is a measurement unit used to indicate signal strength
  • Fiber Optic Cable – A fiber optic cable is used when creating networks and they contain glass fibers inside casing. They’re designed for high-performance data and they can transfer large amounts of data over longer distances.
  • Firewall – A firewall is a network security device that views incoming and outgoing web traffic and decides whether to allow or block based on defined security rules.
  • Gbit or Gb – A Gigabyte (GB) is a measurement unit of data.
  • HDMI – HDMI stands for High Definition Multimedia Interface and it is commonly used for carrying high definition video and audio over a single cable to your TV.
  • IP CCTV – An Internet Protocol closed-circuit television (IP CCTV), is a type of digital video camera that receives data and sends it via the internet.
  • IPAF – The International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) are a recognised governing body for the use of access equipment such as cherry pickers.
  • ISP – An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is the technical term for the company who deliver your internet access.
  • LAN – A Local Area Network (LAN) usually describes a network at the same geographical location, for example, the London office.
  • NICEIC – NICEIC is a certification provider for contractors working across the building and installation services sectors.
  • PAT Testing – PAT or portable appliance testing is a policy in the UK where regular health and safety checks are carried out on all electrical appliances within the workplace.
  • Patch Leads – Patch Leads are short cables often call “network cable” which are to connect one device to another device in your network. Often they’ll be the lead which connects from your desk phone or PC to the wall.
  • PDQ – this is your card reader you use to take transactions at a till.
  • RJ45 – RJ45 connectors are seen on Ethernet cables and networks. They are the small plastic plugs on each end of the cable that is inserted into the RJ45 jacks of Ethernet devices like a router.
  • SWA – Steel Wire Armoured (SWA) cable is a product that protects the data cable with a strong outer coating.
  • Switch – this piece of IT equipment is the life blood of your network connecting all of your devices together and essentially is your “network”.
  • Trunking – Trunking is used to conceal and protect your cables. Usually plastic and white, you may be sitting right next to it, just look for your plug sockets, it’s the plastic next it! However, trunking isn’t always necessary if there’s an option to conceal the cables in the walls.
  • UTP – Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cabling is designed to eliminate electromagnetic interference.
  • VGA – A Video Graphics Array (VGA) is a type of connection for video devices such as monitors and projectors.
  • VOIP – A voice over IP (VoIP) system is where your traditional phone service is instead delivered over the internet via a VOIP phone or device.
  • WAN – A wide area network (WAN) is a network that covers a large area. You would use it if you had offices in several locations.